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Courtney Love to play lead in New York opera

Love will sing in Todd Almond's composition about lovers in the Midwest

Antonia Molloy
Friday 03 October 2014 10:33
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"I love the concept, and I’m loving the music"
"I love the concept, and I’m loving the music"

Courtney Love is to make her opera debut in New York.

The Hole frontwoman and wife to the late Kurt Cobain will sing in Todd Almond’s Kansas City Choir Boy, self-described as “a theatricalized concept album about love altered by unexpected fate”.

While Love may seem an odd choice, composer and performer Almond claims to be "fascinated" by the outspoken artist.

He told the New York Times: "I’ve always been fascinated with her. I love her voice, and I think she’s a great actress. And I thought she would find the character interesting."

His enthusiasm was echoed by the woman herself, who is keen to exercise her vocal chords on the new project.

She told the newspaper: "I love the concept, and I’m loving the music.

"I’m playing it constantly. I’m looking to do things that are different. I just finished a rock tour of Australia, and it was great, but I’ve been doing that for a long time. I wanted to do something challenging."

Directed by Kevin Newbury, the opera is part of the third annual PROTOTYPE: Opera/Theatre/Now festival, which is co-produced by Beth Morrison Projects and HERE.

Intended as "a love song for the computer age", Kansas City Choir Boy tells the story of a couple in small town America, who separate when the woman goes in search of destiny and disappears.

Almond said it is not an opera in the usual sense of the word, but rather “a group of songs that tell a story”.

Love, who turned 50 in July, has attracted controversy throughout her career. However, she remains an acclaimed musician and actress with a reputation as one of the greatest rock stars of all time.

Kansas City Choir Boy will open at HERE on 8 January 2015.

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