Eurovision 2017: Germany entry accused of copying David Guetta and Sia song 'Titanium'

Viewers noticed the song bears a striking similarity to the 2011 track

Germany's caused a controversy at this year's Eurovision song contest after the country's entrant performed a song which many viewers believed has copied a song made famous by David Guetta and Sia.

The country's song, titled 'Perfect Life' and sung by Levina, bears a strong similarity to 2011 track 'Titanium.'

People took to Twitter in their droves to point out the similarity.

Portugal emerged victorious at this year's ceremony having been the longest-running entrant to have never won, beating Bulgaria and Moldova.

UK's entry Lucie Jones finished in 15th place with her ballad 'Never Give Up On You' after impressing critics and viewers alike.

Croatia - whose performance saw singer Jacques Houdek perform what looked like a duet with a giant VT version of himself - finished in 13th place.

Earlier in the evening, Graham Norton - who provided the evening's commentary - paid another fitting tribute to Eurovision legend Terry Wogan who sadly passed away in 2016.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in