Leigh-Anne Pinnock: Little Mix star seemingly addresses video in which she was ‘mocked’ by Jesy Nelson

‘I know my character,’ singer said

Jacob Stolworthy
Monday 18 October 2021 07:47
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Jesy Nelson responds to 'blackfishing' accusations

Little Mix star Leigh-Anne Pinnock has seemingly addressed the video in which she was “mocked” by Jesy Nelson and Nicki Minaj.

Last week, during an Instagram Live, Nelson discussed an alleged comment by Pinnock, her former bandmate, that had claimed to have been leaked from an Instagram message.

The leaked message, which could not be verified by The Independent, purportedly showed Pinnock calling Nelson a “horrible person” and referring to her ongoing blackfishing controversy.

Minaj seemingly criticised Pinnock, to which Nelson laughed in response. She has since faced a backlash from Little Mix fans.

Pinnock is yet to officially respond the furore, but in a video shared to social media by her sister Sairah, she can be seen seemingly referring to the situation while delivering a tearful speech for her 30th birthday.

“I’m 30 years old, I know my character, you all know my character, everyone who meets me knows my character,” she says in the clip, adding: “That’s all I care about.’”

Pinnock then gives a special shout-out to her fiancé, Watford footballer Andre Gray, and their twins, stating: “And best believe everything I stand for, everything I’m fighting for is for them. And I will never stop. I’ve found my voice now and I will continue to use it.”

Leigh-Anne Pinnock and her husband, the footballer Andre Gray

In 2020, the singer shared her personal experiences of racism since becoming a part of the band in 2011.

Pinnock said she often felt like the “least favoured” member of the group because of her race, and that she “sings to fans who don’t see me or hear me or cheer me on”.

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She has been campaigning against racial inequality and, earlier this year, released a BBC documentary titled Race, Pop & Power.

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