Noel Gallagher hits out at Jeremy Corbyn 'Captain Fishy', Diane Abbott and Nigel Farage

Wide-ranging interview with Oasis star saw him rail against modern British politics, the divide caused by Brexit, and the current state of Jeremy Corbyn's Labour party

Roisin O'Connor
Music Correspondent
Saturday 15 June 2019 15:23
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Noel Gallagher plays Wonderwall at Isle of Wight festival

Noel Gallagher has hit out at Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn in a colourful interview where he despaired at the state of modern British politics.

The rock star, who previously said he would rather reform Oasis than see “lunatic” Jeremy Corbyn elected, now branded him a “f***ing student debater, f***ing captain fishy craggy old f***ing donkey, f*** off”. He also described shadow home secretary Diane Abbott as “the face of f***ing buffoonery”.

“They talk pipe-smoking communist nonsense, do you know what I mean? I think the role of any politician in the world is to be forward thinking, and modern, and contemporary - looking forward,” he told the Manchester Evening News.

“And make no mistake, in this country we need someone and it ain't him. And it's never been anyone from the Conservative party."

He added: “The two extremes are the Labour Party don't respect people who are aspirational, and the Conservative Party don't protect the vulnerable. But somewhere in the middle is where New Labour danced, and they kind of had it f***ing right, and then 9/11 happened, and here we are.”

Earlier in the interview, Gallagher said he felt “bad for the nation” at how Brexit had been handled, and how “this unremarkable little man, Farage, this unremarkable little f***ing man, from nowhere, appears out of nowhere seemingly and has like somehow f***ing tapped into something that none of us were aware of”.

“It's really sad f***ing times,” he continued. “But the thing I think about it is, when we eventually do leave, it'll be f***ed up for a bit, right, then it'll just get back to normal. No one is going to ostracise GB from the rest of the world. We're too f***ng brilliant. There's a lot of f***ing great things going on in this country. I don't think when we leave we go into the abyss… It's just sad that people are so divided now.”

All of that said, Gallagher said Remainers calling for the Brexit vote to be overturned should "go to North Korea" if they weren't happy with the results of a "democratic f***ing process".

The interview was published the day after Gallagher headlined the first day of Isle of Wight festival, and also after his band’s new EP Black Star Dancing was released via Sour Mash Records. Read the full interview here.

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