Ringo Starr calls Brexit a ‘great move’ while admitting he didn't vote in the EU referendum

Beatles drummer says severing ties with Brussels will give UK chance 'to be in control' of its destiny

Ringo Starr on Brexit: "The people voted and now they have to get on with it"

Ringo Starr has championed Brexit as a “great move” for Britain – despite admitting he did not vote in the EU referendum.

The Beatles drummer said last year's surprise result gave the UK the chance “to be in control” of its own destiny when it severs ties with Brussels – planned within the next two years.

But he criticised MPs who he believes are dragging their heels on our withdrawal from the bloc and urged them to “get on with it”.

It came as MPs voted in favour of key legislation on Monday to end the supremacy of EU law in Britain.

Ringo told BBC Newsnight: "The people voted and they have to get on with it. Suddenly, it's like 'Oh well, we don't like that vote'.

"What do you mean, you don't like that vote? You've had that vote. This is what won, let's get on with it."

The world-famous musician, who lives in the US, was touring with his All-Starr Band in America when Britons went to the polls for the EU referendum on June 23 last year.

Citizens from the UK who are based abroad had the opportunity to have their say in the historic ballot by casting their vote through the post.

But Ringo admitted he failed to take advantage of the service, despite suggesting he was unable to have his say. He said: "I would have voted for Brexit, I would have voted to get out.

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“I think it’s a great move. I think, you know, to be in control of your own country is a good move."

He then joked: “But don’t tell Bob Geldof.” The former Boomtown Rats singer is a staunch critic of Britain’s withdrawal from the EU and has admitted what “consumes me is stopping Brexit”.

MPs on Tuesday passed a motion in Parliament that will grant the government the power to scrutinise Brexit legislation without wider parliamentary input.

The EU Withdrawal Bill aims to give British laws supremacy over those from the EU when the UK leaves the bloc in March 2019.

But critics described the government motion as a “power grab”, saying it gave the Conservative party the right to tinker with legislation without seeking approval from MPs.

It came days after thousands of anti-Brexit activists marched in London in opposition to Britain's planned withdrawal from the EU.

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