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Roger Daltrey snaps at journalist over question on Brexit and the music industry: 'As if we didn't tour Europe before the f***ing EU'

Musician seemed irritated by the question

Roger Daltrey doesn't think Brexit will affect the music industry

Roger Daltrey had a strong reaction to a question about whether he believes Brexit will have a negative impact on the music industry.

The Who frontman was speaking with Sky News when he was asked for his view on the EU.

Daltrey, who has previously voiced his support for Brexit, looked unhappy with the question and responded: "No, what's it got to do with the rock business?"

"How are you going to tour in Europe?" the journalist asked.

"Oh dear," Daltrey said. "As if we didn't tour Europe before the f***ing EU. Oh, give it up!"

After walking off camera for a moment Daltrey returned and said: "If you want to be signed up to be ruled by a f***ing mafia, you do it. Like being governed by Fifa."

In an interview with The Telegraph last year Daltrey claimed many people failed to distinguish that he was "anti-Brussels, not anti-Europe".

"That's why I'm so angry about it," he said. "I want someone at least answerable to me that I can say: 'F*** off, you're useless!"

While Daltrey may be confident about the impact (or lack of) that Brexit will have on the music industry, a number of prominent industry figures have been airing their concerns over the past year.

In December 2018, artists including Annie Lennox, Paloma Faith, Pink Floyd's Nick Mason, Nadine Shah, Billy Bragg and Blur's Dave Rowntree, plus music companies including Kilimanjaro Live and Beggars Group, and industry bodies like AIM, the Musicians Union and the Music Producers Guild, all signed a letter seeking more concessions against Brexit's potential impact on the industry.

The letter was drafted by the pro-Europe group Music4EU, and stated: "Brexit represents a significant threat to the UK's music industry. Leaving the EU customs union, single market, VAT area and regulatory framework (in whole or part) could devastate our global market leadership, and damage our freedom to trade, tour and to promote our artists and works."

It continued: "The music industry contributes £4.5bn to the UK economy, and our world-beating artists helped to create exports of over £2.5bn, which is growing fast in a global digital music business. Live music is at the heart of every artist's business and contributed around £1bn to the UK economy, and freedom of movement is core to an artist's ability to tour and promote their art."

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