Snoop Dogg faces potential lawsuit after publicly calling out UberEats driver on Instagram

‘I have high anxiety and I fear for my family’s safety,’ said the driver after Snoop shared his personal information on social media

Annabel Nugent
Saturday 26 February 2022 14:40
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Snoop Dogg is facing a potential lawsuit after he publicly called out his UberEats driver for failing to deliver his food.

Earlier this month, the rapper shared a video to Instagram showing messages exchanged between himself and a driver from the food delivery service.

In the messages, the employee can be seen repeatedly telling Snoop that he has arrived and asking the rapper to “plz answer”.

After he has waited the required eight minutes, he then tells Snoop that he is leaving because he does not feel safe.

“This is not a safe place,” the driver wrote, according to the video, prompting Snoop to reply: “Yes it is, pull up to the gate.”

In the clip shared to Instagram, Snoop said: “Motherf***er  from f***ing Uber Eats didn’t bring my f***ing food. Talking about he arrived. ‘This is not a safe place.’ Punk motherf***er – where my food at n***a? You got all my goddamn money, punk.”

As per Complex, CBS Los Angeles reports that the driver now plans to file a lawsuit against Snoop.

The driver, named Sayd, said: “It’s my picture there and also there is my first name. After I saw the video, I’m kind of like, I have high anxiety and I fear for my family’s safety. I contacted the customer many times and I followed the protocol by the book.”

Snoop Dogg

Shortly after the failed delivery went viral on social media, Uber issued an apology to Snoop.

“We truly regret Snoop Dogg’s frustrating experience. We have reached out to apologise and refunded him for the order,” the company said.

Sayd – who has not returned to work since the incident – said that he believes he is the one owed an apology after Snoop broadcast his personal information with his millions of social media followers.

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Sayd said: “When I read that [apology], I just felt like it’s not fair because I am the one that deserves an apology from UberEats, not Snoop.

“But I have to fight for my rights and my family’s rights. I just feel like I’m not really well from this delivery and also UberEats.”

The Independent has contacted a representative of Snoop Dogg and UberEats for comment.

At the time Snoop posted the video, some fans argued that the rapper was the one in the wrong as he had not answered the driver’s initial messages.

Others defended the Sayd on the basis that he was following protocol, which states that he is free to leave after waiting the allotted eight minutes.

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