Travis Scott debuts new track at BBMAs in first TV performance since Astroworld tragedy

Last week, P Diddy announced the ‘great breaking news’ that Scott would be performing at Sunday night’s awards event

Peony Hirwani
Monday 16 May 2022 07:19
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Travis Scott performs at the Billboard Music Awards 2022

Travis Scott debuted a new unreleased single during his performance at the Billboard Music Awards 2022.

According to multiple outlets, the track is reportedly titled “Lost Forever.”

The 31-year-old rapper made his first televised performance on Sunday (15 May) since the Astroworld tragedy last November.

Last week, P Diddy announced the “great breaking news” that Scott would be performing at the forthcoming BBMAs on his Instagram account.

“I have some great breaking news. This just in,” said the 52-year-old rapper, whose real name is Sean Combs, adding: “For the Billboard Music Awards this Sunday, I made a request, I made a demand. I said ‘My brother Travis Scott has to perform.’ Diddy is hosting the show – I’m executive producing – he has to perform.’

“And NBC said ‘Yes.’ So, it’s going down Sunday. Travis Scott will be performing.”

In addition to Scott, controversial singer Morgan Wallen along with other top artists like Megan Thee Stallion, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Silk Sonic, Ed Sheeran, Mary J Blige, and Florence and the Machine also performed during the ceremony in Las Vegas.

Travis Scott and Jazelle perform onstage during the 2022 Billboard Music Awards

Scott played his first live public show to a sold-out crowd at Miami nightclub E11EVEN last week – six months after the incident at his Astroworld music festival in Houston, Texas, which left 10 people dead and scores more injured.

Before that, he has performed at a handful of private events including a pre-Oscars house party in March and a short set during a Coachella afterparty in April.

The Astroworld tragedy involved a deadly crowd surge on 5 November 2021, with victims ranging in age from nine to 27 years old.

Roughly 300 people were injured and treated at the Six Flags Park in Houston, where Scott was headlining Astroworld, while 25 had to be taken to hospitals.

Scott is currently a defendant in more than 380 lawsuits that have been filed by Astroworld victims and attendees, claiming billions of dollars in damages from him, festival organiser Live Nation, Apple and others.

The suits allege the music festival in Houston was negligently planned and staged, and that the crowd surge during Scott’s performance was preventable. Scott and the other defendants have denied any wrongdoing.

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