Catfish and the Bottlemen, O2 Academy Glasgow, gig review: Beers fly but will anyone remember them in the morning?

Belt-em-out rock songs aplenty, but new material hints at no great departure from their first album

Chris Green
Tuesday 05 April 2016 16:37
Comments
Catfish and the Bottlemen look set to emerge from relative indie obscurity
Catfish and the Bottlemen look set to emerge from relative indie obscurity

If you’ve tuned in to any alternative or indie music station in the UK over the past year, the chances are you’ll already be familiar with Catfish and the Bottlemen. The four-piece’s 2014 debut album The Balcony was full of dance-along, belt-em-out rock songs and has proved to be a sleeper hit, earning them best British Breakthrough Act at February’s Brit Awards.

So far, mainstream chart success has eluded them. But based on the frenzied, beer-flying reception they received in Glasgow last night on the opening night of their tour to promote new album The Ride, this is a band that looks set to emerge from relative indie obscurity and start booking stadiums.

From the opening chords of their first song “Homesick” to closing numbers “Cocoon” and “Tyrants”, the young crowd of indie kids screamed out every word, turning the ground floor of the 2,500 capacity Gorbals venue into one giant, sweaty mosh pit. The bar areas soon became more like first aid stations, doling out water and stopping nosebleeds.

At times, frontman Van McCann didn’t even need to bother singing, stepping away from the microphone and listening to his lyrics – mainly about relationships, booze and hangovers – being chanted back at him. The new material the band showcased during their hour-long set suggests their second album, due out in May, will be no great departure from the first.

“I always say: if you can play it on an acoustic guitar and win over a bar or a kitchen even of rowdy people then you’ve done it,” McCann has said in the past. Catfish’s songs certainly do that – but it remains to be seen whether anyone will remember them the next morning.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in