Photographer captures abandoned theatres from Belgium to Morocco

Pictures document what happens when culture leaves a building behind

<p>Turin, Italy</p>

Turin, Italy

These fascinating photographs show the abandoned and crumbling theatres of Europe.

Dimitri Bourriau, 38, says he has visited over a thousand abandoned places around the world, but has a passion for former show halls.

The Paris-based photographer's work has seen him tour locations including Italy, Belgium, Portugal and as far afield as Morocco and Georgia.

Tangier, Morocco

Charleroi, Belgium

He says his mission is to keep a photographic trace of “old theatres so that no one forgets them.”

Dimitri explains: “My series of photos “Innuendo Teatro” is a series that I have been working on for six years. It brings together some of the most beautiful theatres I have visited.

“I am passionate about architecture and theatres so I combined my two passions in photographing old theatres.

Turin, Italy

Paris, France

“I have travelled several continents in search of abandoned theatres. I try to transcribe what I see in photos. Keep in photos a trace of its old theatres so that no one forgets them.

“Photographing old theatres is not easy, it is often very dangerous. Buildings are often in danger of collapsing. You have to be very patient.

The exterior of Gran Teatro Cervantes in Tangier, Morocco

Gran Teatro Cervantes’ interior

“One of my favourite theatres is the Gran Teatro Cerventes in Morocco. It was an emblematic place of Tangier. It was abandoned for over 60 years. It was an old Spanish theatre built by a wealthy merchant in 1913.

“I had come across an old newspaper article that talked about this theatre. I had no idea if it still existed. I had forgotten its existence until one day, one of my contacts in Morocco told me about it.

Porto, Portugal

Kutaisi, Georgia

“I decided to take a plane ticket and go see this theatre for myself. I was surprised by the imposing size of the building. Once inside, it was extremely dark. I had to wait for the light to come in.

“There was a real atmosphere, everything was still there, the seats, the stage, nothing had changed for 60 years. Everything was covered in dust.

Bar-le-Duc, France

Paris, France

“I stayed several hours to visit all the rooms. It was the most beautiful abandoned theatre that I have discovered.”

SWNS

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