Making a Murderer subject Brendan Dassey appeal case denied by Supreme Court

He maintains that the police coerced him into confessing to a crime he did not commit

Jacob Stolworthy
Tuesday 23 October 2018 09:18
Comments
Making A Murderer trailer

The Supreme Court has refused to hear the appeal case of one of the subjects of Netflix true-crime series Making a Murderer.

Brendan Dassey's plea for a lower court ruling contended his conviction of involvement in the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach claiming that the police coerced him into confessing.

28-year-old Dassey, who was 16 at the time of the murder, told Manitowoc County officers that he had helped his uncle, Steven Avery, rape and murder the freelance photographer after being interrogated four times in 48 hours.

He is currently serving life imprisonment for murder, sexual assault and mutilation of a corpse in connection with Halbach's death.

CNN reports that Dassey's lawyers have maintained that his constitutional rights were violated adding that he was convicted based solely on the confession and with no physical evidence. Court papers included accusations against his interrogators of feeding him the “right” answers despite displaying “significant intellectual and social limitations.”

Despite this, a panel of judges ruled against Dassey's appeal maintaining that he spoke “freely” when confessing to the crime.

His attorney, Laura Nirider, has vowed to “continue to fight for Brendan and the many other children who have been wrongfully convicted due to the use of coercive interrogation tactics.”

Nirider added: “Unfortunately, Brendan isn't alone. Over the past 20 years, extensive empirical and psychological research has shown that children under 18 are between three and four times more likely to falsely confess than adults - and yet the criminal justice system fails many of them. It's up to the courts to put an end to this.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in