Charli XCX accuses BBC of promoting Reggie Yates’ Extreme UK rather than her documentay on feminism

The singer wrote that they should be promoting positivity rather than negativity

Jack Shepherd
Tuesday 15 December 2015 15:54 GMT
Comments
Charlotte Emma Aitchison aka Charli XCX poses in the green room for a portrait before the Sonos And Pandora Present "An Evening With Charli XCX" event at Sonos Studio in Los Angeles, California
Charlotte Emma Aitchison aka Charli XCX poses in the green room for a portrait before the Sonos And Pandora Present "An Evening With Charli XCX" event at Sonos Studio in Los Angeles, California

Reggie Yates’ latest BBC Three documentary has left a lot of people very angry. In the second episode of Extreme UK, he spoke to young British men who feel that “feminism has gone too far”.

The show was entitled “Men at War”, and showed Yates talking to some of the leaders of the movement who genuinely felt that men’s rights were being compromised.

In a clip released beforehand by the BBC, the 32-year-old presenter is seen speaking to American blogger and ‘pickup artist’ Roosh V, best known for his book Bang: The Pickup Bible That Helps You Get More Lays. Watch below.

The two-and-a-half minute video angered singer Charlie XCX, who accused the BBC of promoting men’s rights more so than discussing feminism.

She wrote: “This snippet is terrifying and annoying… I made a doc for BBC3 which was shown at 10:30 on a Tuesday when a lot of my audience were unable to watch. This doc seems (from this snippet) to be discussing feminism in an entirely negative light and is shown prime time at 9pm.”

The documentary she is referring to is her “The F Word and Me”, which followed the singer as she spoke to other musicians about their experiences in the music industry.

She wasn’t the only one outraged, as while the show was airing Twitter was full of people dismissing people on the show, especially when defamed comedian Dapper Laughs made an appearance.

Of course, the point of the show, much like Louis Theroux’s controversial documentary’s, is to show groups of people the presenter doesn't necessarily condone, but instead opens up discussion between people.

The men in Yates’ show didn’t come off well, just in the above clip alone you can see Yates struggling with what Roosh is saying. It is unbelievable that such people still exist, but they do and they need to be criticised openly rather than people just ignoring them, surely?

The BBC have been contacted for comment but have yet to respond.

Join our commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in