Fargo season 3: Showrunner teases further plot details including Ewan McGregor's sibling rivalry

'This year it starts with these two brothers'

Jack Shepherd
Wednesday 01 June 2016 10:43
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Last week, Trainspotting’s Ewan McGregor was announced as the leading cast member of season three of FX's Emmy Award-winning Fargo.

Minor details regarding the third part in the series, set in the world of the Coen Brothers’ original film, were also released, detailing how the Scottish actor will play two brothers, Emmit and Ray Stussey.

Emmit is a self-made real estate mogul and family man, a self-proclaimed “America success story”, while his slightly younger brother is a balding, pot-bellied parole officer who peaked in high school.

Showrunner Noah Hawley has added some further details, confirming a major part of the next season will be the sibling’s rivalry.

“Yeah, I think that’s a safe assumption,” Hawley told EW. “The fun thing with the show is that for whatever reason I had to figure out how to tell what purports to be a Coen brothers story, and it always tends to start with a catalyst.

“The first year was two men in an emergency room, the second year was a woman driving home with a man stuck in the windshield of her car, and this year it starts with these two brothers.

He continued: “There is an old wound between them that sort of gets reopened and re-litigated, and that rivalry becomes contentious and that sort of puts all the events in motion. The fun soup of it is you have to have enough moving parts that everything is on a collision course, but which parts are going to collide?

“There’s this element of randomness to it, which I think adds to the truthiness of our fake true story. So, it starts with Ewan and Ewan as brothers. It’s not as big character-wise a story as the second year, but I’m really excited about it.”

Martin Freeman, Billy Bob Thornton, and Alison Tolman starred in Fargo's first season while season two saw a cast overhaul paving the way for Patrick Wilson, Ted Danson, and Kirsten Dunst. The Coen Brothers recently revealed how ‘true’ the original story is.

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