Game of Thrones: George RR Martin reveals his least favourite scene in the HBO series

Author got candid about his favourite and least favourite sequences in the HBO adaptation

King Robert Baratheon goes hunting in season one of Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones author George RR Martin has revealed his “least favourite scene” in the HBO adaptation of his books. 

The fantasy series was not without its controversies. Many fans took issue with its extended torture scenes, depictions of rape, and drawn-out battle sequences, however, the series’ author is most critical of something else entirely.

Speaking to Entertainment Weekly’s editor-at-large James Hibberd, Martin got candid about the hit show.

His least favourite scene came in the first season when the series had its smallest budget – although production was still reportedly allocated approximately $6m (£4.61m) per episode.

“Where we really fell down in terms of budget was my least favourite scene in the entire show, in all eight seasons: King Robert goes hunting,” said the author.

The HBO series became famous for its hugely expensive battle sequences

Martin went on to explain his disappointment with the clip: “Four guys walking on foot through the woods carrying spears and Robert is giving Renly s***. 

“In the books, Robert goes off hunting, we get word he was gored by a boar, and they bring him back and he dies. So I never did [a hunting scene]. But I knew what a royal hunting party was like.”

The author described what he had hoped the sequence would entail: “There would have been a hundred guys. There would have been pavilions. There would have been huntsmen. There would have been dogs. There would have been horns blowing — that's how a king goes hunting!”

Martin concluded: “[King Robert] wouldn't have just been walking through the woods with three of his friends holding spears hoping to meet a boar. But at that point, we couldn't afford horses or dogs or pavilions.”

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The 72-year-old did, however, share his praise for other adapted scenes. He commended the show’s depiction of Ned Stark’s death and the infamous Red Wedding.

Martin’s comments will be published in the book Fire Cannot Kill a Dragon, a forthcoming oral history book by Hibberd. The book is scheduled for release on 6 October.

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