Justin Trudeau says he wants to punch Matthew Perry and demands rematch

'I've been giving it some thought, and you know what, who hasn't wanted to punch Chandler? How about a rematch,' says Canadian Prime Minister

Maya Oppenheim
Monday 03 April 2017 09:56
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Matthew Perry admits to beating up Justin Trudeau at school

Justin Trudeau has challenged Matthew Perry to a rematch after the Friends actor recently revealed he beat the Canadian Prime Minister up during school days.

Perry, who plays Chandler in the wildly popular sitcom, grabbed headlines last month after admitting to having a fight with Mr Trudeau when he was just ten years old. The pair crossed paths at Rockcliffe Park Public School in Ottawa in Canada.

Mr Trudeau has now hit back, expressing his eagerness to punch the actor and saying he is keen for round two.

Perry graciously declined the request and quipped he was fearful of Mr Trudeau’s Canadian army.

“Justin Trudeau I think I will pass at your request for a rematch kind sir (given that you currently have an army at your disposal),” he said.

Mr Trudeau’s tweet was sent on April Fools Day so is likely to have been written in jest. It was during an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live last month that Perry first spoke of the playground altercation.

"I have a story about him that I'm not proud of,” he said. "My friend Chris Murray, who was also in the fifth grade in Canada, reminded me that we actually beat up Justin Trudeau. We both beat him up."

Casting his mind back to the day, Perry claimed the clash was triggered by “pure jealousy”.

"I think he was excelling in a sport. He was the only kid in school that we could beat up."

Despite the fact Mr Trudeau’s father, Pierre Trudeau, was Canada’s prime minister at the time of the furore, Perry said he did not think that was the reason they decided to beat him up.

"I'm not bragging about this. It's terrible. I was a stupid kid I didn't want to beat him up," the actor said.

But Perry suggested that maybe the ordeal had inadvertently done Mr Trudeau, who has gone on to become a hugely popular politician, a favour.

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"I think it was rather instrumental in him going to such great heights and becoming the prime minister. I think he said, 'I'm going to rise above this and I'm going to become prime minister.'"

Mr Trudeau, who is leader of the Liberal Party, has become something of a celebrity politician since taking office in November 2015. From yoga poses to quantum computing explanations, charity strip teases and fervent declarations of feminism, he has carved out a massive online presence.

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