BBC Big Night In: Prince William jokes he hasn’t seen Tiger King as he ‘avoids shows about royalty’

Comedy sketch also saw Stephen Fry reprise one of his most famous Blackadder characters

Adam White
Thursday 23 April 2020 20:26
Comments
Prince William says he hasn’t seen Tiger King as he ‘tends to avoid shows about royalty'

Prince William has joked that he has yet to watch Tiger King as he “tends to avoid shows about royalty”.

Appearing in a comedy sketch for the BBC charity event Big Night In, the Duke of Cambridge conversed with Stephen Fry, who was portraying his Blackadder character Lord Melchett – the personal advisor to Queen Elizabeth I.

William, appearing on Melchett’s laptop, asked him for television recommendations, revealing that he was feeling slightly out of sorts amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“It’s hell without EastEnders,” William confessed.

Melchett responded: “They tell me Tiger King is rather good?”

“I tend to avoid shows about royalty,” William replied.

A Netflix sensation, the docuseries Tiger King revolves around the rivalry between a big cat breeder and the woman he was convicted of conspiring to kill.

After Melchett reminded William that it was nearly time for the pair to go their separate ways, the Duke said that he had to make a few clothing changes beforehand.

“Let me just see if I can find my socks, and my shoes and my trousers.”

William then led the night’s clap for carers with wife Kate Middleton and their three children George, Charlotte and Louis.

The sketch came an hour into the BBC’s live event, put together by Comic Relief and Children in Need. It aims to raise money for the fight against coronavirus.

Presented by names including Lenny Henry, Matt Baker, Zoe Ball, Davina McCall and Paddy McGuinness, it features comedy sketches and stars performing from their own homes and appearing via video link.

Follow along with the BBC’s Big Night In on our live blog.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in