Sherlock series three named most-watched BBC drama in a decade

 

Agency
Wednesday 22 January 2014 14:36
Comments
 Sherlock series three has been named the BBC's most popular drama in a decade
Sherlock series three has been named the BBC's most popular drama in a decade

The third series of Sherlock has become the most-watched drama run in over a decade, the BBC said today.

The three-parter - which included consulting detective Sherlock Holmes's apparent return from the dead - pulled in an average of 11.82 million viewers when it was screened earlier this month.

The BBC said it was its “most-watched drama series in over a decade”. The “consolidated” figures include not only those who watched it live but also people who recorded it or used catch-up services over the following seven days from first broadcast.

Viewers saw the last episode climax with what appeared to be the possible return of arch-villain Moriarty.

Figures have already shown that the first episode of the series - starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Holmes and Martin Freeman as sidekick John Watson - had the biggest-ever catch-up audience, with 3.5 million watching since the first screening.

It had a consolidated audience of 12.72 million, while the other two programmes had 11.38 million.

BBC1 controller Charlotte Moore said: “This latest accolade is the icing on the cake and only further demonstrates the audience's huge appetite and appreciation for original British drama on BBC1.”

PA

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in