Malala Yousafzai says she’s ‘deeply worried about women and minorities’ in Afghanistan

In 2012, then 15-year-old Malala was shot by a Taliban gunman who strongly opposed her vocal activism

Arpan Rai
Monday 16 August 2021 19:35 BST
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<p> Pakistani activist for female education and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai has expressed concern  for women, minorities and human rights advocates  </p>

Pakistani activist for female education and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai has expressed concern for women, minorities and human rights advocates

Hours after the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan at an unprecedented speed, education activist Malala Yousafzai expressed shock and concern for women and minorities in the disturbed region.

The Nobel Prize laureate also asked for action from global agencies to safeguard refugees and civilians.

“We watch in complete shock as Taliban takes control of Afghanistan. I am deeply worried about women, minorities and human rights advocates,” the 24-year-old activist wrote on Twitter.

In a call-to-action, the Pakistani activist added: “Global, regional and local powers must call for an immediate ceasefire, provide urgent humanitarian aid and protect refugees and civilians.”

In 2012, then 15-year-old Malala was shot by a Taliban gunman who strongly opposed her vocal activism surrounding education of women. Malala was returning home after taking an exam when she was shot in the head. She was later shifted to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in the UK.

Nations watched in shock as President Ashraf Ghani-led Afghanistan crumbled in the last 120 hours, with a dramatic capture of the capital city Kabul by Taliban militants. Mr Ghani left Afghanistan on Sunday afternoon, moments before Taliban announced its complete domination in the region.

Late night visuals from the Afghanistan International Airport showed chaos on the crowded tarmac as citizens scrambled to get on planes and leave the country as Taliban announced its firm control from the presidential palace in Kabul. Taliban officials seated at the chair of palace declared the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan - a name used by the militant organisation before US took control, reported Associated Press (AP).

In the last 24-48 hours, western countries rushed to evacuate their people out of embassies as grim visuals showed helicopters shuttling from the US embassy to the airport. Smoke appeared from the embassy’s rooftop as diplomats reportedly set fire to sensitive material.

The Taliban has pressed on, seeking a peaceful transfer of power and amnesty for those who worked with foreign countries or the Afghan government. However the group is known for the hardline policies — especially against women and children — it enforced before they were forced out by US troops 20 years ago.

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