11 strikingly normal evening routines that set some of the most powerful names in business up for success

Aine Cain
Monday 09 October 2017 13:04
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How do some of the most successful people in the world wind down after a busy day?

Some don't — they just work through the night and get by on as little sleep as possible.

But others have set up specific bedtime rituals.

Sticking to a comforting routine around bedtime can help people sleep better, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Here are the evening routines of 11 successful individuals, including Oprah Winfrey, Jeff Bezos, and Mark Zuckerberg:

Virgin founder Richard Branson eats dinner with family and friends

Before turning in around 11 p.m., Branson winds down with family and friends after dinner, Business Insider reported. He wrote that "stories are shared and ideas are born" during such conversations.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg tucks his kids in

Every night, the Facebook CEO tucks his daughter Max in with a traditional Jewish prayer, the "Mi Shebeirach," The Huffington Post reported. It's likely the tradition still continues, given Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla recently welcomed another daughter, August.

'Shark Tank' star Daymond John writes down his goals

According to Business Insider's Rich Feloni, the "Shark Tank" judge creates a detailed list of his goals, including descriptions and deadlines for each one.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg enjoys some 'bad TV'

The Facebook COO sometimes unwinds by catching a few episodes of "bad TV," before turning off her phone and heading to bed, according to her post on Quora.

Microsoft founder Bill Gates washes the dishes...

The richest man in the world has a very specific bedtime routine.

After dinner, he always washes the dishes, even if other people volunteer. Gates told Reddit users that he likes the way he washes the dishes.

Then, CNBC reported the Microsoft founder likes to read for an hour, to help himself fall asleep.

... And so does Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

The CEO of Amazon shares a habit with Gates — he likes to wash the dishes, too.

"I'm pretty convinced it's the sexiest thing I do," he once told Business Insider Editor-in-Chief Henry Blodget.

Intuit CEO Brad Smith catches a show with his family

The Intuit CEO finishes the day by eating dinner with his family and watching a TV show before bed, Business Insider reported.

First Daughter Ivanka Trump checks her email

Trump wrote in her book "Women Who Work" that she sometimes enjoys relaxing over wine, pasta, and the "Real Housewives." More often, however, the First Daughter spends most of her time answering emails, according to MyMorningRoutine.com.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai spends time with his family

The Google CEO has emphasized achieving a work-life balance in the past. Back in 2015, Pichai promised to be home every night in time to put his kids to bed himself, Buzzfeed reported.

Thrive Global founder Arianna Huffington sets herself up for a night of quality sleep

Since founding Thrive Global, Huffington has become a major advocate for proper sleep hygiene and wellness in general.

According to Huffington's book "The Sleep Revolution," her bedtime ritual includes "'escorting' her electronic devices out of her room," a hot bath, and a soothing cup of chamomile or lavender tea. Huffington caps the night off by writing down a list of things she's grateful for.

Media mogul Oprah Winfrey meditates

Every night, Winfrey takes some time to meditate before bed, according to CNBC.The Huffington Post reported she is a supporter of Transcendental Meditation, a practice favored by executives and Wall Streeters.

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Read the original article on Business Insider UK. © 2016. Follow Business Insider UK on Twitter.

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