Scotland rejoices as AOC tries Irn-Bru: ‘I love it, love it’

Congresswoman’s followers urged her to be brave and try even more dubious Scottish staples

Andrew Naughtie
Wednesday 10 November 2021 18:09
Comments
<p>Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at COP26 in Glasgow</p>

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at COP26 in Glasgow

Leer en Español

Upon her arrival in Glasgow for the denouement of the Cop26 climate change conference, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez took it upon herself to touch upon one of the cornerstones of Scottish culture.

“I finally got a hold of some Irn-Bru,” she tweeted, celebrating the livid orange drink that serves as one of the country’s national consumables.

“This tastes like the Latino soad, Kola Champagne,” she said in an Instagram video she posted of herself drinking the beverage.

“This tastes just like a Puerto Rican soda,” she continues, smiling.

“This is Kola Champagne. Oh my god. I love it, love it.”

The drink appeared to have been sourced for her by Scotland’s first minister Nicola Sturgeon, who tweted: “Amidst all the serious business at #COP26 today, I’m pleased to also report that @AOC now has a supply of Irn Bru.”

The usual quotient of AOC-loathing Twitter users aside, Scotland’s online ambassadors welcomed her to their idiosyncratic gastronomic culture with open arms.

More than a few users suggested her next step should be to seek out some Buckfast Tonic Wine, a far deadlier substance closely associated with Scotland, Glasgow in particular, and violent antisocial behaviour.

The brand itself wasted no time getting in on the action.

First sold in 1901, Irn-Bru was trademarked under its current vowel-deficient moniker in 1946 after manufacturer Barr’s was forced to omit the word “brew” because the drink is not, in fact, brewed (though it does technically contain iron thanks to a miniscule amount of ammonium ferric citrate). The precise 32-ingredient recipe is a closely guarded secret shared by as few as three people.

The brand has a history of marketing campaigns that have pushed the boundaries of taste. Among them were the minstrel-like mascot Ba-Bru and his companion Sandy, who adorned billboards and comic strips for decades before being withdrawn in the 1970s. Another ad from the early 2000s that showed a housewife shaving and singing that she “used to be a man” was withdrawn after a row with broadcasting regulator Ofcom.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in