World’s largest floating wind farm to be built off coast of England and Wales

‘Gwynt Glas’ project will be 20 times larger than the biggest floating facility built to date

Harry Cockburn
Environment Correspondent
Monday 17 January 2022 22:37
Comments
<p>The new wind farm will be around 43 miles off the coast</p>

The new wind farm will be around 43 miles off the coast

A major new wind farm is to become the world’s largest floating offshore wind facility and will operate in the Celtic Sea, in Welsh and English waters, energy company EDF has announced.

The biggest floating wind farm in the world is currently the 50MW Kincardine offshore wind farm off the coast of Aberdeen in Scotland, but the new facility will be 20 times as large, generating 1GW of power.

The project, called "Gwynt Glas", which means "blue wind" in Welsh, is a joint venture involving EDF, which is owned by the French state, and DP Energy, a renewable energy company based in Ireland, and the firms said it will provide power for approximately 927,400 homes.

An exact site is yet to be confirmed, but EDF said "an area of interest encompassing some 1,500km2 has been identified, approximately 70km (43 miles) from the shore, with initial remote aerial surveys for marine mammal and birds taking place since Spring 2021".

The distance means the array would not be visible from the shore. At sea level, a six-foot tall person can see around 5km (3 miles) to the horizon.

EDF and DP Energy said the project would create jobs in the south west of England and in Wales, and would support local communities.

EDF Renewables UK head of offshore wind, Scott Sutherland, said: "We firmly believe Gwynt Glas will be a catalyst for further supply chain growth across the UK which is something we as a company are very supportive of.

“We will use our experience in offshore wind to help bring opportunities for local, regional and national companies on this project and on others, such as our Blyth floating project and the two we are bidding for in the ScotWind process.”

He added: “Floating offshore wind is an exciting new technology and will bring much needed inward investment which can regenerate coastal economies and communities.”

Simon De Pietro, chief executive of DP Energy said: “With EDF Renewables UK we have found a strong ally to develop Gwynt Glas, who place strong emphasis on capturing the regional supply chain and local community opportunity, alongside protecting our environment.

“Each member of the DP Energy UK team based in Pembroke Dock was born and raised in Wales and are passionate about supporting the growth of a new energy sector that can sustain skilled, well-paid jobs for future generations in coastal regions, in Wales and in the South West of England.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in