'Cheers' overtakes 'thank you' as favourite offer of gratitude, poll finds

Most respondents think Britain should be more thankful as a nation, researchers find

Wednesday 10 July 2019 18:49
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An aerial view shows people sitting in formation to the words "thank you" and displaying signs that collectively read "Arigato" (Thank You) during an event celebrating Tokyo being chosen to host the 2020 Olympic Games, at Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building in Tokyo
An aerial view shows people sitting in formation to the words "thank you" and displaying signs that collectively read "Arigato" (Thank You) during an event celebrating Tokyo being chosen to host the 2020 Olympic Games, at Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building in Tokyo

Cheers” has overtaken 'thank you' as the most popular way to show verbal appreciation, according to a new survey.

More than four in 10 of us now regularly use the word instead of the more traditional response, the poll of 2,000 adults foundf.

One in five respondents also believed that saying “thank you” sounded too formal and opted for catchier phrases of gratitude such as “cool”, “brilliant”, and “ta”.

Overall 73 per cent felt that as a nation we should be a little more thankful and do more to show gratitude for hard work, kindness and acts of generosity.

Eight in 10 believed people should be thanked more for kind actions and loyalty, with more than half finding a nod or other gestures to be better placed than words.

The survey also found that respondents were most likely to show their thanks for something when given a present or when someone holds open a door, at 78 per cent respectively.

Other scenarios asking for a show of respect included being bought a drink (72 per cent), being given change after making a payment (72 per cent) and after being complimented on appearance (69 per cent).

Gratitude was also likely to be expressed when receiving a card (61 per cent), someone saving you a seat (67 per cent) or after enjoying a meal in a restaurant (63 per cent).

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“Saying thanks – or an appropriate alternative phrase – can go a long way to make others feel special and worthy," said a spokesman for Lottoland, which carried out the poll. “Receiving thanks can make you want to work harder, continue to be loyal, or be even kinder in the future.

“As this study shows, there are many ways to express appreciation, in addition to words this might be a hug for someone special or a high five for a good friend.''

SWNS

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