Anthoine Hubert death: What Lewis Hamilton said when he saw fatal F2 crash live while speaking to media

Formula One world champion was holding his post-qualifying interviews when Hubert’s horrific Formula Two accident occurred, prompting a number of drivers to end their media duties

Jack de Menezes
Wednesday 04 September 2019 08:35
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'Oh wow... I hope that kid's good' Moment Lewis Hamilton reacts to fatal F2 crash during live interview

Lewis Hamilton was speaking to the media after his qualifying performance at the Belgian Grand Prix when he saw the horrific Formula Two accident live that claimed the life of young Frenchman Anthoine Hubert.

The 22-year-old succumbed to injuries shortly after a terrifying accident on the exit of Eau Rouge on the second lap of the F2 feature race, which also involved Sauber Junior Team driver Juan Manuel Correa.

Hubert was confirmed dead by the FIA in a statement that shocked the motorsport community, and leaves a dark cloud hanging over Sunday’s Belgian Grand Prix with the paddock still in mourning. Correa underwent surgery on Saturday night after fracturing both legs, with the American also having a minor spinal injury. He is in a stable condition.

Hamilton will be one of those drivers who will have to run through the same section of corners on Sunday that claimed the life of Hubert.

The five-time world champion had the F2 feature race in his eye-sight when the crash occurred, prompting him to say: "Oh wow. Hope that kid's good. Wow. That's terrifying."

He would then walk away without saying another word, with Mercedes cancelling their evening media commitments as a result of the horrendous news.

A number of drivers were speaking to media post-qualifying at the time of the accident, with Red Bull’s Alexander Albon cancelling his session when the crash happened.

The FIA elected to cancel both F2 races this weekend, meaning that Sunday’s scheduled sprint race will not go ahead. Tributes are being planned for the build-up to the main Grand Prix.

Lewis Hamilton saw Anthoine Hubert's fatal accident live

Hamilton went on to post a heartfelt message on Instagram, in which he insisted that the dangers that the drivers face every weekend are not fully understood by those watching. "This is devastating. God rest your soul Anthoine. My prayers and thoughts are with you and your family today," he wrote.

"If a single one of you watching and enjoying this sport think for a second what we do is safe you’re hugely mistaken. All these drivers put their life on the line when they hit the track and people need to appreciate that in a serious way because it is not appreciated enough.

"Not from the fans nor some of the people actually working in the sport. Anthoine is a hero as far as I'm concerned, for taking the risk he did to chase his dreams. I'm so sad that this has happened. Let's lift him up and remember him. Rest in peace brother."

The statement read: “The Federation Internationale de l’Automobile [FIA] regrets to advise that a serious incident involving cars #12 [Correa], #19 [Hubert] and #20 [Alesi] occurred at 17:07 CET on 31/08/19 as a part of the FIA Formula Two Sprint Race at Spa-Francorchamps, round 17 of the season.

“The scene was immediately attended by emergency and medical crews, and all drivers were taken to the medical centre.

“As a result of the incident, the FIA regrets to inform that the driver of car #19, Antoine Hubert [FRA], succumbed to his injuries, and passed away at 18:35 CET.

“The driver of car #12, Juan-Manuel Correa (USA), is in a stable condition and is being treated at the CHU Liege hospital. More information on his condition will be provided when it becomes available.

“The driver of car #20 Giuliano Alesi (FRA) was checked and declared fit at the medical centre.

“The FIA is providing support to the event organisers and the relevant authorities, and has commenced an investigation into the incident.”

Anthoine Hubert died during the F2 Belgian Grand Prix feature race

The collision between Hubert and Correa caused significant damage to both cars as they hit the wall again, with Correa going airborne and coming to a rest upside down. The impact was fierce enough to expose Correa's feet as the front section of the car broke away, leaving him trapped in the cockpit, while Hubert's car broke into two as the monocoque split from the rear section of the car.

Hubert was born in Lyon and started karting at the age of 12, before beginning his single-seater career in 2013. He competed in the French F4 Championship, winning the title that year, and progressed through Formula Renault, Formula 3 and GP3, where he clinched last year’s championship with ART that secured him a place in this year’s Formula Two championship with BWT Arden.

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