What does the Uber ruling mean for the UK gig economy?

To address the complex challenges thrown up by the rise of the gig economy we need action from ministers, not just rulings from judges, argues Ben Chu

Friday 19 February 2021 19:17
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<p>Uber driver Yaseen Aslam outside the Supreme Court, London, on Friday after justices ruled that drivers should be classed as workers, not independent third-party contractors</p>

Uber driver Yaseen Aslam outside the Supreme Court, London, on Friday after justices ruled that drivers should be classed as workers, not independent third-party contractors

I

t’s been described a “landmark” ruling for the gig economy – but precisely what fresh territory does it signify?

The Supreme Court ruled on Friday that a group of 35 Uber drivers who took legal action against the company were not “self-employed” and should not have been treated as such by the Silicon Valley technology company, despite what their contracts said.

They were, then, legally entitled to benefits such as paid leave and the minimum wage.

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