Why a culture and entertainment revolution is closer than you think

In the coming months, we will see plays and music performances that would never have otherwise existed, delivered in ways we’ve never experienced before, writes Alexandra Pollard

Saturday 22 August 2020 00:13
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Alexandra Palace is putting on a drive-in event to showcase a new version of Puccini’s ‘La bohème’
Alexandra Palace is putting on a drive-in event to showcase a new version of Puccini’s ‘La bohème’

This week, something extraordinary landed in my inbox. It was an invitation to a film screening. Not a Vimeo link or a Zoom invite. An actual screening. In an actual cinema. It was the first of its kind that I’ve received since February, which by my estimation was 73 years ago.

As a devilishly catchy viral video puts it, the pandemic isn’t over just because we’re over it. But it has been heartening over the past few weeks to see cultural events slowly but surely popping back up again. If done safely, they can be wonderful. Folk outfit Fisherman’s Friends performed on a Cornish cliff top.

The Donmar Warehouse put on a play – well, a socially distanced sound installation – called Blindness. Alexandra Palace is putting on a drive-in event to showcase a new version of Puccini’s La bohème­. London’s first dedicated public art walk has been created. Soon, an immersive outdoor performance called C-O-N-T-A-C-T will begin its run.

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