Fashion shouldn’t make us choose between sustainability and inclusivity

When we call in samples to test for a feature, high street brands more often than not turn out to stock only one sample dress size – usually an 8 or a 10

Ellie Fry
Saturday 05 October 2019 00:48
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Plus-size models such as Tess Holliday are challenging industry norms
Plus-size models such as Tess Holliday are challenging industry norms

Over the past year, we’ve seen two significant shifts in the fashion industry: sustainability and plus-size inclusivity.

We’ve seen G7 leaders joining forces with fashion houses in a global pact to make clothes more sustainable, and body-positivity advocate and plus-size model Tess Holliday walking for Chromat at New York Fashion Week. Clearly, the way we think about clothes is changing.

When you work on a product review section like IndyBest, as I do, you have a responsibility to be conscious of both trends in areas like fashion and global movements, such as sustainability. We’ve always strived to be as inclusive as possible in our features – across sizing, style and price – but recently it’s become more important than ever to consider whether promoting fast fashion is ethical.

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