The evidence of discrimination against black people in the UK labour market

What does the evidence actually show when it comes to the economic outcomes of black people in the British labour market – and what can that evidence tell us about discrimination and racism in the UK? Ben Chu investigates

Wednesday 14 April 2021 22:38
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<p>The unemployment rate of black people aged 16 to 24 has almost doubled over the past year to 42 per cent – for white people the rise has been much smaller</p>

The unemployment rate of black people aged 16 to 24 has almost doubled over the past year to 42 per cent – for white people the rise has been much smaller

In its analysis of the UK labour market, the recent Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (CRED), chaired by Tony Sewell, talked up a positive story of a closing gap between the outcomes of various ethnic groups in the UK.

The government-commissioned report spoke of an “overall convergence story on employment and pay” and added: “There have been more signs of social progress than social regress over the past 50 years”.

Yet new research this week from the Resolution Foundation seems to show a remarkably different picture.

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