Politics Explained

Labour’s use of parliamentary tactics shows that it does indeed ‘have a plan’ – in contrast to Boris Johnson

The debate and votes on the Queen’s Speech have provided the main opposition party with fresh opportunities, and they have been seized with the kind of vigour not seen for years, writes Sean O'Grady

Wednesday 18 May 2022 00:18
Comments
<p>The Labour Party’s front bench, for the first time in more than a decade, is stronger than that of the Tories </p>

The Labour Party’s front bench, for the first time in more than a decade, is stronger than that of the Tories

For those looking for a change in government, or even just a more competitive political contest, the revival of the Labour Party in parliament has been a remarkable and welcome development.

The debate and votes on the Queen’s Speech have provided the main opposition party with fresh opportunities, and they have been seized with the kind of vigour not seen for years. On successive days, Labour is deliberately tabling amendments to the government’s programme in favour of a windfall tax on energy companies, and then asking for an emergency Budget.

Neither has much chance of success, but both will attract the sympathy of some on the Conservative benches, from all sections of that party, who are frustrated with the government’s clumsy and tone-deaf response to the cost of living crisis.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in