Peat restoration on grouse moors ‘cutting tons of carbon emissions’

Left untouched, dried and damaged peat emits CO2 into the air, writes Sam Hancock

Grouse moors have been criticised for controlled burning of heather on peatland, seen on right of fence, which managers say is necessary to reduce wildfire risks
Grouse moors have been criticised for controlled burning of heather on peatland, seen on right of fence, which managers say is necessary to reduce wildfire risks

More than 60,000 tons of carbon dioxide are being prevented from entering the atmosphere every year due to acres of peat restoration, grouse moor managers in England and Wales have claimed.

A survey of Moorland Association (MA) members suggests 3,157 hectares (7,800 acres) of bare peat has been restored on their land in the past 10 years.

It also found that 2,945km (1,830 miles) of old agricultural drains, put in to make the land more productive for farming, have been blocked to re-wet the upland peat to protect it, reduce run-off and prevent carbon emissions escaping – helping to restore the equivalent of a further 6,000 hectares.

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