‘Computer says no’: Rishi Sunak under fire for blaming ageing IT for failure to hike benefits

Experts dispute chancellor’s claim, arguing Universal Credit can – and has – been increased quickly

Rob Merrick
Deputy Political Editor
Friday 13 May 2022 17:05
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Rishi Sunak claims' computer says no' stopped him increasing benefits

Rishi Sunak is under fire after an extraordinary claim that “computer says no” forced him to impose real-terms benefits cuts in his spring mini-budget.

The chancellor has been strongly criticised for increasing payments to struggling people by only 3.1 per cent last month – far below the inflation rate of 7 per cent and rising.

Now Mr Sunak has blamed the government’s antique computer system, despite previously suggesting it would be too costly and that other help is available.

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