We’re not abusing remote working – it’s a lifeline for carers like me

Rather than suggesting employees aren’t pulling their weight when working from home, which simply isn’t true, sceptics should consider that their lived experience might not match other people’s, writes Ruth Rainbow

Saturday 02 October 2021 09:54
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<p>‘As a professional, remote working has opened up new opportunities for me to engage with my colleagues across the UK’ </p>

‘As a professional, remote working has opened up new opportunities for me to engage with my colleagues across the UK’

This week, remote working has again been in the spotlight after city bosses declared it unproductive. But for many women, carers and those with additional responsibilities, remote working has been an opportunity to find balance and thrive.

After I graduated, I worked in an agency environment for over a decade. I loved the long days, late nights and high salary. I remember what it’s like having those kinds of privileges and pressures. But all that stopped when my son was diagnosed as autistic and dyspraxic. In addition to being a full-time professional, I was suddenly a carer too. My working world was never the same again.

Having to care for my children meant that I was left out of the everyday in-person interactions that can make or break a career. My responsibilities mean I’ve had to take roles within a two or three-mile radius of school, and it’s limited what I’ve been able to do professionally.

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