Paws on the Street: Neighbourhoods with more dogs have lower crime rates, study suggests

Findings add another reason why dogs are good for humans, scientists say

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Neighbourhoods with more dogs had lower rates of homicide and robbery compared to those with fewer dogs, at least when residents had high levels of trust in each other, according to a new study conducted in Columbus, Ohio.

The research, published last month in the journal Social Forces, suggests that people walking their dogs puts more “eyes on the street”, which can discourage crime.

“People walking their dogs are essentially patrolling their neighbourhoods. They see when things are not right, and when there are suspect outsiders in the area. It can be a crime deterrent,” study lead author Nicolo Pinchak from Ohio State University, said.

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