“For separated families, you’ll need evidence of approval from your child’s other parent" Mr Connor says
“For separated families, you’ll need evidence of approval from your child’s other parent" Mr Connor says

Hidden peril of going on holiday when your children have a different surname to you

Holidays are being derailed for approximately 600,000 parents travelling with children with different surnames, according to the Manchester Evening News.

Beth Timmins
Sunday 14 May 2017 23:11
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The rigmaroles of travelling, from endless passport checks to bulging bundles of visa documents, are magnified when journeying with the little ones.

But for parents travelling with children who don’t have the same surname, the process is even more difficult.

If the correct documentation is not provided at these security points, parents could face disruptions and even be turned away.

These struggles through their journey security points have hindered approximately 600,000 parents according to the Manchester Evening News.

David Connor, a Lancashire based family lawyer, is trying to warn parents of the issues that could halt them at the check-in, refuse them at the border crossing or even unwittingly land them in a child abduction case.

“For separated families, you’ll need evidence of approval from your child’s other parent, but remember to seek approval from everyone with parental responsibility – this may include grandparents too”Mr Connor told the Manchester Evening News.

If there has been a name change after a divorce, he added that it is wise to bring the relevant child arrangement order paperwork.

Mr Connor says further documentation, such as a death certificate if the child’s other parent has passed away and a copy of the child’s birth certificate, should also be brought.

Hannah Marshall a mother from Wigan, was halted at London Stansted Airport, while travelling back from a holiday in Denmark with her daughter Lily.

"They told us that my partner should have taken her through passport control because I would need to prove she was my daughter. They checked my partner's passport to prove she held the same last name and then let us through,” Ms Marshall told the Manchester Evening News.

Ms Marshall added that passport security had quizzed her over the different surnames and asked Lilly directly who Ms Marshall was to her before her partner’s passport was approved.

The security issues are amplified for parents who have children with a different surname to their own, showing that it’s worth having the right papers to hand if you want to avoid derailing your next trip.

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