Coronavirus: Children of key workers create giant rainbow tribute to NHS staff in school playground

Rainbow has become a symbol for people wanting to show solidarity with key workers

Playmobil releases coronavirus explanation video for children

Children who had to attend school during the Easter break have paid tribute to NHS staff working on the frontline during the coronavirus pandemic.

On Monday, a group of pupils at Sheringham Community Primary School in Norfolk took some time out of their school day to show their appreciation of healthcare workers.

The children – who had to go to school during the holidays because their parents are classified as key workers – posed alongside a giant rainbow created in their playground.

A photo of the colossal rainbow, which was drawn by the pupils using coloured chalk, was taken using a drone as the children laid on the ground surrounding it.

A message written in the centre of the rainbow read: “Thanks NHS”.

Mrs Rachael Carter, the school’s head teacher, praised staff for ensuring pupils were kept busy and well looked after while their parents go to work.

“The school staff have been absolutely amazing in organising different and varied activities for the children to do, especially during this Easter holiday period and I would like to thank them all for their hard work and dedication during these difficult times,” she said.

“It is so important that the school remains partially open to care for and support the children of key workers and we are more than happy to do so.

“On behalf of everyone at Sheringham Primary we would like to thank all of the key workers who are doing such a fantastic job.”

In recent weeks, the rainbow symbol has been adopted by people wanting to show solidarity with NHS workers fighting against Covid-19.

The trend was reportedly started by a nurse who wanted to create “a sign of hope” for patients and staff in hospitals across the country.

Health officials have asked for any rainbow artwork to be shared on social media using the hashtag #RainbowsForNightingale.

Elsewhere, people in New Zealand have been taking part in a nationwide teddy bear hunt to help keep children entertained during lockdown.

To help ease the burden on families with small children, thousands of people have joined in with the initiative which was inspired by Michael Rosen's popular children’s book We’re Going on a Bear Hunt.

The scheme aims to spread positivity during the lockdown period by asking households across the country to place teddy bear toys in their windows for children to spot while they are going for walks in their local neighbourhoods.

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