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Drivers who splash pedestrians deliberately could face fines of up to £5,000

Drivers who commit the offence could receive a three points penalty

Sabrina Barr
Thursday 03 October 2019 09:08
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Drivers who deliberately splash pedestrians amid the wet weather could be fined up to £5,000.

This week, as Hurricane Lorenzo makes its way over the UK, the country is expected to face freezing temperatures, blustering winds and heavy downpours of rain.

Drivers will need to be on high alert when they are out on the road, in order to ensure they are driving as responsibly as possible in the wet conditions.

They also need to act in a considerate manner towards pedestrians, who may find themselves drenched as they stand or walk by the side of the road.

According to the Road Traffic Act 1988, a person may be charged with the offence of “careless and inconsiderate driving” if they drive “a mechanically propelled vehicle on a road or other public place without due care and attention, or without reasonable consideration for other persons using the road or place”.

An example of inconsiderate behaviour includes splashing pedestrians on purpose, breakdown cover and car insurance company RAC explained.

“Anyone unfortunate enough to have suffered a drenching by an inconsiderate motorist splashing them when driving through a puddle would probably welcome a sizeable financial penalty for the driver,” said Pete Williams, road safety spokesman for the RAC.

Williams added that the majority of drivers who commit the offence will likely receive a £100 fine and three penalty points.

“If, however, they refuse [the notice] then they will face a magistrate who could impose a fine up to £5,000, although the maximum is very unlikely,” he said.

Citizens Advice explained that splashing a pedestrian is not an offence "unless it can be proved that the motorist acted carelessly or deliberately."

"If it can be proved that the motorist acted deliberately they can be charged with driving without due care and consideration for other road users."

Car insurance company ingenie further emphasised the importance of avoiding getting pedestrians wet on the road.

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“Driving through puddles to splash pedestrians is illegal (and it’s just mean),” the company tweeted.

“It comes under driving without reasonable consideration for others and can get you three points, plus a £100 – £5,000 fine if it goes to court. Remember – pedestrians have feelings too.”

For all the latest news on weather in the UK, click here.

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