Baftas 2019 red carpet: Kate Middleton, Letitia Wright, and all the stars wearing white

 'We are so wearing white tonight'

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive at 2019 BAFTAs

Kate Middleton, Margot Robbie and Rami Malek have championed sartorial white on the red carpet at the Baftas 2019.

On Sunday, the film industry and members of the British royal family gathered at the Royal Albert Hall in London to celebrate the numerous contributions to the cinematography industry over the last year.

For the occasion, several Hollywood actors including Linda Cardellini, Jonna Lumley and Mary J. Blige chose to wear white for the ceremony.

The move comes a year after attendees at the awards show wore black to show their solidarity with victims of sexual misconduct following a request from the Time’s Up movement - an organisation that supports individuals who have experienced sexual misconduct in the work place.

Arriving with her husband the Duke of Cambridge, the Duchess of Cambridge teamed her Alexander McQueen asymmetric white dress with a pair of diamond-drop earrings, which once belonged to the late Princess Diana, and a pair of Jimmy Choo “Viola” shoes.

Meanwhile, Robbie donned a monochrome embelished dress by Chanel Couture with oversized navy tulle shoulders.

For the ceremony, Blige opted for a white Ralph and Russo suit which comprised of a fitted blazer covered in gold detailing with a train. She accessorised the look with gold drop earrings and a gold sequined clutch bag.

Rachel Weisz and Letitia Wright made the decision to wear off white outfits for the ceremony, dressed in a pearl-hued ruffled dress and a lilac/white-tone tuxedo by Stella McCartney, respectively.

Following Weisz's win for Best Supporting Actress for The Favourite, Lumley — who wore a white suit for the occasion —noted three out of four women on the stage were matching in white and commented: "We are so wearing white tonight."

But the love for the white wasn’t just shared among female attendees.

Bafta nominated actor Rami Malek was also spotted wearing a pristine white tuxedo at the event.

The actor paired his look with a black shirt, black bow tie and shiny black Chelsea boots.

White is set to be a big trend for spring/summer 2019 after the likes of Giambattista Valli, Tome and Stella McCartney presented several white designs on the red carpet during September fashion month last year.

Earlier this week, several female lawmakers in the US wore “suffragette white” at President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address in a symbol of unity with women across the world.

Margot Robbie and Salma Hayek arrive at BAFTA red carpet

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who was seated behind the president and the subject of a meme following his address, wore a cream blazer and white top for the occasion.

She later tweeted that her decision to wear white was to show support for women’s rights, “in spite of a [president] who doesn’t”.

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