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Which of the seven types of breasts highlighted by a lingerie firm do you have?

From "round" to "asymmetric" 

Kashmira Gander
Monday 14 March 2016 10:26
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A lingerie firm has highlighted and catered to the fact that all women’s bodies are unique, by identifying seven different types of breasts.

Bras are generally fitted according to the width of the woman’s chest and how far her breasts protrude.

But the size guide on the ThirdLove website also takes into account the breast’s other characteristics, such as length and fullness.

The illustrations on the firm’s "Breast Shape Dictionary” depict a range of breast types, and is intended to help women choose a bra that best suits her body.

The seven type include the “Round” breast, which is equally full at the top and bottom and the “East West” where nipples face outwards.

“Side Set” describes breasts with a wide space inbetween; while breasts that are different sizes are called “Asymmetric”.

The dictionary also includes the “Bell Shape”, or breasts which are slim at the top and full at the bottom; “Slender”, where the breast are thin and the nipples point downwards; and the “Tear Drop” which are round at the bottom, but less full at the top.

"During our product design process, we discovered that getting a great fit was about identifying the style that best suits your natural shape," Ra’el Cohen, vice president of design and product development at ThirdLove, told Women's Health.

ThirdLove’s Breast Shape Dictionary is the latest attempt by lingerie companies to acknowledge that women’s bodies vary.

American Eagle’s lingerie brand Aerie has been praised for no longer featuring altered photographs of models in its campaigns.

Ultimo s founder: The business of bras

Suggesting that women prefer advertising that cater to a range of bodies, the firm saw a 26 per cent spike in profits in its most recent quarter.

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