Jess Glynne removes make up with legion of women in powerful Brits performance

'That was one of the most empowering performances I’ve ever seen'

Katie O'Malley
Thursday 21 February 2019 08:35
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Brit awards 2019: Jess Glynne performs with HER, by taking off makeup on stage

Jess Glynne has been praised on Twitter after removing her makeup during a powerful performance at the Brit awards 2019.

Towards the end of the awards show, the singer took to the stage with a legion of women to perform her hit single “Thursday”.

During the performance, Glynne – who wore a strapless white dress for the rendition – began to remove her fake eyelashes and wipe off her eye makeup while singing the lyrics “I won’t wear makeup on Thursday / ‘Cause who I am is enough”.

Sitting on stage in a makeup chair, the star was joined by a group of women, also dressed in white, who simultaneously removed their makeup using hand towels in front of dozens of dimly-lit vanity mirrors.

Halfway through the song, the British star was accompanied by two-time Grammy award winner H.E.R.

Behind them, a video of countless women removing their makeup appeared which made a marked statement about the importance of combating unrealistic beauty standards and embracing self-love. .

Fans of the pair have taken to Twitter to commend the artists for their female empowerment performance and critique of the rules of perfection society often blindly adheres to..

“I love that @JessGlynne and her backing singers are taking off all their make-up on stage,” wrote one fan.

“That was one of the most empowering performances I’ve ever seen,” added another.

One tweeted: “By far the most powerful performance I’ve ever seen.”

The standout moment came after 1975 frontman, Matt Healy, took to the stage to accept the band’s award for “Best Group” and spoke about misogyny in the entertainment industry.

Quoting an article written about singer Ryan Adams by friend and music journalist Laura Snapes, Healy said: “Male misogynist acts are examined for nuance and defended as traits of ‘difficult’ artists, [while] women and those who call them out are treated as hysterics who don’t understand art.”

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