Milan Fashion Week 2019: Model Edie Campbell told she’s ‘too fat’ to open show

Campbell responded to the derogatory remark by enjoying a ‘slap up brekkie’

Sabrina Barr
Friday 22 February 2019 10:28
Comments
Model Edie Campbell on pressures of the fashion industry and her advice for aspiring models

Model Edie Campbell was told she was "too fat" to open a runway show at Milan Fashion Week 2019.

Campbell, who's modelled for brands including Chanel and Burberry and appeared on the cover of British Vogue, revealed on Instagram that she'd recently been subject to a contentious remark regarding her weight.

The British model shared a selfie of herself and artist Christabel Macgreevy on her Instagram story, showing the pair enjoying a hotel breakfast spread.

"When a brand says you are 'too big' to open their show so you get @christabitch round to have a slap up brekkie," Campbell wrote.

"By 'too big' I don't mean 'too famous'. I mean 'too fat'," she added in a second post.

On Thursday 21 February, Campbell was one of several models who took part in the late Karl Lagerfeld's last Fendi catwalk in Milan.

A day prior, the model had also walked the runway for Italian fashion label Alberta Ferretti.

Campbell was named "Model of the Year" at the 2013 British Fashion Awards, an accolade that was presented to her by fashion photographer and frequent collaborator Tim Walker.

The 28-year-old was also dubbed an "icon" within the fashion industry by models.com last year.

Edie Campbell
Edie Campbell

Campbell has been critical of the fashion industry in the past, having last year called for models to be provided with private changing rooms when getting ready for shows.

The model explained to BBC Radio 4 that it can be "humiliating" for models to have to change in front of others.

"It's sort of quite jarring and then there comes a point when it becomes very normalised for you," she said.

In November 2017, the model wrote an open letter for WWD detailing the abuse fashion models frequently face.

“We operate within a culture that is too accepting of abuse, in all of its manifestations,” she wrote.

“This can be the ritual humiliation of models, belittling of assistants, power plays and screaming fits.

"We have come to see this as simply a part of the job.”

Support free-thinking journalism and attend Independent events

For everything you need to know about Milan Fashion Week, click here.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in