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The best men's fashion pieces of the season: From white shirts to watches

For autumn/winter 2015, menswear has got real, with designers offering bold new takes on the pragmatic and the accessible. From London to Detroit, we celebrate the best of them

Chukka boots
Chukka boots

BOOT

Brazil-born, London-based Paula Gerbase, 32, is the creative director of John Lobb. Her aim: to imbue classic pieces – like the chukka boot pictured above – with something different. Namely, the slick, cerebral cleanliness that has marked out Gerbase's nascent label 1205 as one to watch. Lobb was founded in 1849, when menswear was being streamlined, an industrial revolution in cloth and leather. Gerbase, too, is getting back to basics.

£1,140, johnlobb.com

SHEARLING JACKET

At Coach, New York's leather goods label, Doncaster-born Stuart Vevers has produced his first full menswear collection. He's drawn on his lust for classic Americana with this update of the US army's B3 bomber jacket. Intended to keep pilots cosy at high altitudes, it will be equally welcome in inclement British weather. Painted to snap, crackle and pop with age, this piece is guaranteed to outlive the current fad for shearling.

£1,900, coach.com

SWEATSHIRT

Vetements is the hottest label in fashion right now. The product of a design collective numbering 18, its engaging and intriguing pieces are garnering plaudits as well as clocking up sales. The clothes are imbued with canny design nous while being eminently wearable. Stuff like this hoodie, perfectly cut, a chopped-up slogan detail adding design interest and emphasising the craftsmanship. Kanye's got one like it. If you care about that sort of thing.

£400, brownsfashion.com

WHITE SHIRT

Kris Van Assche, Homme designer at Dior, has pinned tokens and talismans to the classic white shirt: among them Dior's initials, and a '47' for the year he created his epoch-defining New Look. Van Assche found his winter look in a wardrobe of formal classics. Toying with the conventions of bourgeois dress and black tie, he combined them with the trainers, pin-badges and baseball caps of the street. But you don't need to know all that. You just see a great shirt. Job done.

£510, dior.com

WATCH

A watch is a major investment – and Rado's Hyperchrome offers something genuinely new: a one piece “monobloc” case forms the entire structure, lightening it while also ensuring its strength and sturdiness. It's a technological breakthrough. It's also suitably jazzy, sleek and monochrome and practical, meaning it's something worth showing your mates. It's 100m-depth water-resistant, too – in case you decide to do so while deep-sea diving.

£3,650, rado.com

JUMPER

Hammond & Co is an 18th-century sporting tailor being given a sporting chance in the 21st century by the combo of Debenhams and the debonair Patrick Grant. Hammond & Co dressed King Edward VII, King George V, the King of Belgium, the Emperor of Austria, the kings of Spain and Portugal. And, er, Queen Victoria. Not sure she would have chosen this monochrome update on the Fair Isle, but it's natty all the same.

£55, debenhams.com

PANTS

British model David Gandy is a strapping advert for a pair of tighty-whities. He's panted up for Dolce and Gabbana before – remember him lounging in a rowing-boat for their Light Blue perfume ads? He looks so good in smalls, he's launched his own line, with the venerable British retail institution that is Marks and Spencer. Their smalls, incidentally, are something of a national treasure, whether or not they're wrapping Mr Gandy's crown jewels.

£20 (for two), marksandspencer.com

JEANS

Has the One Direction-fuelled reign of the skinny jean come to a close? Probably not. But at least now catwalks are offering alternatives, and they're trickling down. Topman's high-fashion Design line proposed styles that flared from relaxed thigh into elephantine hem. Too bold for most, perhaps, but the influence of all that flapping fabric can be clearly seen in a loosening-up of the jean silhouette. Cut close, but not cleaving, these new (old) jeans are an easy investment.

£45, topman.com

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