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Lacoste replaces iconic crocodile logo with endangered species as part of conservation campaign

The brand has partnered with the International Union for Conservation of Nature for the limited edition range

Olivia Petter
Friday 02 March 2018 13:43
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Lacoste profiles 'Save Our Species' campaign in new trailer

Lacoste has dropped its iconic crocodile logo in a bid to save endangered species with a limited edition range of polo shirts.

In partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the French tennis brand will release 10 different shirts embroidered with animals who are currently at risk of extinction such as the Kakapo parrot and the Sumatran tiger.

Just 1,775 polo shirts will be available in total, in a move that will see the fashion label replace its signature crocodile icon for the first time in its 85-year history.

This polo shirt features the California condor, also known as the 'Thunderbird' 

“By buying a polo, you participate in helping IUCN and Lacoste in the fight for wildlife conservation worldwide,” a statement from the brand reads.

The shirts will be sold for $183 (£132) each on the brand’s website, with sales donated to the IUCN as part of the conservation campaign, which was launched this week at Paris Fashion Week.

Animals featured on the polo shirts include the vaquita, a sea mammal with just 30 specimens remaining; the Burmese roofed turtle; the northern sportive lemur and the Javan rhino, of which there are just 67 specimens remaining.

Availability of each shirt corresponds to how many of that species remain i.e. there are just 231 California condors in the world, meaning that just 231 polo shirts with this logo will be released.

News of the campaign has proved hugely popular on social media, with fans praising Lacoste for their conservational efforts and setting their sights on the ones they intend to purchase and expressing disappointment that some seem to have already sold out.

“The new Lacoste collection features endangered species and that is just the most adorable thing in the clothing industry,” wrote one fan.

“Bravo Lacoste. Really like this endangered species campaign. #SaveOurSpecies,” added another.

However, not everyone was impressed by the price tag for the limited edition garments, with one person writing on Twitter that the different icon might make it look like a fake version of a real Lacoste polo shirt:

“These are great but don't wanna spend 140 for someone to think im wearing a Laturtle knock off,” they said.

The Independent has asked Lacoste to clarify how profits from the polo shirts will be spent.

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