Met Gala 2018: Catholicism mixes with fashion on the red carpet

The theme was incorporated through crosses, headpieces and wings

Chelsea Ritschel,Rachel Hosie
Tuesday 08 May 2018 11:00
Comments
Met Gala 2018: Red carpet fashion

The world's biggest stars pulled out all the stops with their outfits for this year’s Met Gala, designed to fit the controversial Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination theme.

Celebrities from the worlds of fashion, music and both small and big screens came together for the biggest event in the fashion calendar - and their looks did not disappoint.

From Papal tiaras and crucifixes to long trains and angel wings, attendees interpreted the theme to varying degrees at the gala held at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and organised by esteemed Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour.

So how did the stars put their spin on the controversial theme?

Rihanna’s arrival on the red carpet made a statement amongst the stunning gowns of celestial silvers, golds and black.

Dressed as a more fashionable version of the Pope, Rihanna’s 2018 Met Gala ensemble wowed with its pearls, crystals and papal mitre.

The dress, a pearl-embellished Maison Margiela Artisanal gown by John Galliano, also featured a matching robe and headpiece.

Rihanna

Katy Perry’s interpretation also turned heads - the singer arrived in a short gold Versace dress with gold thigh-high boots, but the focus of her outfit were the life-size feathered angel-inspired wings that completed the look.

Katy Perry is angelic on the red carpet

Alternatively, Kate Moss opted for a short black Saint Laurent dress with small black wings.

Other celebrities incorporated the theme in simpler ways, with many opting for a crucifix to accent their gowns, despite the fact that wearing religious symbols as fashion accessories is considered unacceptable by many.

Vogue editor-in-chief Wintour arrived in a white custom Chanel sparkling gown with a long cross necklace.

Anna Wintour

Crucifixes also appeared in model Laura Love's outfit, who opted for a short black Versace dress with red and green crosses.

Co-sponsor Christine Schwartzman accessorised with the religious symbol, opting for a double-layered gem-encrusted crucifix to pop against her blue gown, as did supermodel Bella Hadid, who wore a simple cross necklace with her black Gareth Pugh gown, and Chadwick Boseman, who donned a Pope-influenced ensemble.

Chadwick Boseman wore a papal-inspired outfit (Getty)

Lily Collins took the theme a step further with her own interpretation - she accessorised her black off-the-shoulder Givenchy gown with a silver halo, a red teardrop and a rosary.

Lily Collins

Last night's exhibition, hosted by Rihanna, Amal Clooney, Donatella Versace, Anna Wintour and Stephen and Christine Schwartzman, featured over 40 pieces on loan from the Vatican.

Pieces include items such as Pope Benedict XV’s silk cape, displayed alongside pieces from Coco Chanel, Versace and John Galliano.

This year’s theme was considered the most controversial yet, however, curator Andrew Bolton has defended his choice.

“Some might consider fashion to be an unfitting or unseemly medium by which to engage with ideas about the sacred or the divine, but dress is central to any discussion about religion,” he said.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in