Style File: It’s a collector’s market for colour

The future looks bright for John Lewis, thanks to the spring offering from its successful menswear label, says Lee  Holmes

Leeholmes
Tuesday 04 February 2014 01:00
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The John Lewis & Co fashion label, launched in 2011, is now into its sixth season. Conceived as a menswear brand aimed at attracting the attention of customers with a slightly more refined fashion palate, it has gone from strength to strength, and has proved to be one of the retailer’s great success stories.

But this should come as little surprise given that men of all age groups are now far more intrested in fashion than ever before. Clearly, those in the know at John Lewis HQ have tapped into a burgeoning market, upping the store’s fashion credentials.

The whole shebang is actually designed by an in-house team lead by Nick Keyte, head of menswear buying. The latest spring collection – called “The Collector” – consists of 90 pieces that marry traditional and modern aesthetics. So what you’ll find is hi-tech fabrics teamed with more conventional fare such as wool. The store has also plundered its own archives, using quirky and eccentric vintage prints on shirts and lightweight jackets.

As you would expect, all of the clothes are wearable and functional.

It’s also reassuring to see that the store continues its work with worthy British manufacturers such as Harris Tweed. Such collaborations help to highlight the fact that these industries are alive and well. However, this latest collection also looks further afield, including garments that have been made and crafted in Japan.

This latest spring offering is given added oomph with its use of eyecatching colours such as chilli and teal. And it is perhaps with a reverential nod to Japan that the colour chrysanthemum yellow is also evident. The flower gives its name to the throne on which the Japanese Imperial Family sit – the oldest constitutional monarchy in the world. Such regal touches cannot fail to impress.

johnlewis.com

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