The Independent’s journalism is supported by our readers. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commission.

Victoria’s Secret accused of stealing Agent Provocateur’s lingerie design

‘How many more coffin nails do we need before we can call @victoriassecret dead?’

Katie O'Malley
Tuesday 20 August 2019 15:39
Comments
Kate Upton on no Victoria’s Secret and body inclusivity

Victoria’s Secret has been accused of copying designs from UK-based lingerie brand Agent Provocateur for its new autumn/winter collection.

On Monday, social media account Diet Prada – which posts about injustices in the fashion industry – shared three side-by-side images of models wearing a pair of identical black briefs and a bra.

On the left hand side of the photographs stands a blonde model wearing a pair of sheer black underwear designed by Agent Provocateur. On the right hand side, two models who represent Victoria’s Secret wear like-for-like designs.

In the photograph's caption, a spokesperson behind the account states that they were unable to “spot any differences” between the two designs.

“Here’s a theory — the teams are too busy watching the news to design so they just keep ordering other designer lingerie to knock off instead lol, [sic]” a excerpt from the post’s caption reads.

The Victoria’s Secret “Mesh Plunge Bra” is currently on sale online for $59.50 (£49.21) and the “Striped Mesh Cheekini Panty” for $29.50 (£24.40). Diet Prada’s post states that Agent Provocateur’s underwear set was released in summer last year. It is currently unavailable to buy online.

The post also referenced the recent controversy surrounding Les Wexner, chairman and CEO of Victoria’s Secret’s parent brand L Brands, and disgraced financier Jeffrey Epstein.

The New York Times recently reported that Epstein, who killed himself in a Manhattan prison earlier this month, presented himself to models as a scout for the brand.

Wexner has denied any knowledge of such conduct. Last month, L Brands’ board of directors said it had hired an outside law firm to conduct a review of Epstein’s role at the retail company.

A segment of the Instagram reads: “How many more coffin nails do we need before we can call @victoriassecret dead? The knockoffs almost seem petty when you hold them up against the Epstein/Wexner ties. [sic]”

The post also features a video of model Kate Upton, who previously worked with Victoria’s Secret, alluding to the ongoing controversy of the brand's lack of body inclusivity on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen.

When questioned about her thoughts on the brand reportedly not hosting its annual fashion show this year, Upton said: “We’re sick of seeing the same body type. You have to be body inclusive now. Every woman needs to be represented, otherwise it’s a snoozefest.”

“We’re with you, Kate. See you at the funeral?” the Diet Prada spokesperson concluded the post.

Diet Prada’s post has been liked over 26,000 times on Instagram and several of its followers have praised Upton for speaking out about the brand’s lack of diversity on the catwalk and in campaigns.

Last month, the Instagram account also accused Victoria’s Secret for stealing designs from lingerie brand Fleur du Mal.

According to receipts obtained by Diet Prada, a spokesperson behind the account claims that an associate buyer with the lingerie brand allegedly purchased $12,656 (£10,469)-worth of Fleur du Mal's lingerie to copy.

Last month, Victoria’s Secret model Shanina Shaik claimed that the lingerie brand’s annual fashion show will not be happening this year.

The 28-year-old told Australia's Daily Telegraph that the 2019 fashion event had been cancelled, but that she believes the runway show will be back in the future.

“Unfortunately the Victoria’s Secret Show won’t be happening this year,” she said. “It’s something that I’m not used to because every year around this time I’m training like an angel.”

Support free-thinking journalism and attend Independent events

Days later, Model Alliance, a non-profit research and advocacy organisation, announced that over 100 models had signed a letter addressed to John Mehas, the US lingerie brand’s chief executive, urging the company to make a legal commitment to protect its employees from sexual misconduct.

Victoria’s Secret “Angel” Doutzen Kroes and supermodels Christy Turlington, Edie Campbell, Gemma Ward, Iskra Lawrence, Karen Elson and Milla Jovovich were among the models who signed the petition.

The Independent has contacted Fleur du Mal, Victoria’s Secret and Agent Provcateur for comment.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in