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Burger King introduces giant cardboard crowns to encourage social distancing

‘The do-it-yourself social-distance crown was a fun and playful way to remind our guests to practice social distancing while they are enjoying food in the restaurants,’ says fast food chain

Helen Coffey
Tuesday 26 May 2020 17:43 BST
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Burger King has launched giant crowns
Burger King has launched giant crowns (Burger King)

Burger King has introduced oversized cardboard crowns in order to promote social distancing.

The fast-food chain is known for giving away its free cardboard headgear, but the new version is several metres wide to prevent customers from getting too close to each other.

Pictures of the new hats, which are currently only being given out at branches in Germany, were shared on social media.

“We wanted to reinforce the rules of high safety and hygiene standards that the BK restaurants are following,” a spokesperson told Business Insider.

“The do-it-yourself social-distance crown was a fun and playful way to remind our guests to practice social distancing while they are enjoying food in the restaurants.”

Like other eateries, Burger King is reopening its restaurants in different countries at different rates, depending on the lockdown restrictions that are in place.

In the UK, Burger King announced plans to open 70 UK outlets for delivery and drive-through orders earlier this month.

However, the chain had to shut a branch in Scotland just days after reopening when large queues at its drive-through service caused traffic jams.

It’s not the only restaurant to introduce innovative measures to encourage social distancing.

Izu Shaboten Zoo in Shizuoka has filled its café with huge stuffed capybaras – giant rodents that are native to South America.

The cute toys are sitting around the café’s tables, meaning patrons are forced to sit further apart from one another and therefore maintain a 2m distance.

Elsewhere, the Inn at Little Washington in Virginia has decided to seat well-dressed mannequins at tables they are unable to use in order to comply with new state regulations and reduce capacity by 50 per cent.

In Amsterdam, the Mediamatic Eten has created mini greenhouses in order to seat diners without breaking social distancing guidelines.

Waiting staff are using long wooden planks to serve guests from a distance.

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