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Don't be fooled - this sandwich is made with vegan meat
Don't be fooled - this sandwich is made with vegan meat

The food that looks like meat, tastes like meat, but is actually vegan – and sold by a man called Kale

'One person said 'I swear I can taste fat marbling in that sausage''

Kashmira Gander
Tuesday 04 October 2016 23:15
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A vegan butcher that sells animal-free meat and cheese is making it harder to find excuses not to go veggie with their mouth-watering creations.

The Herbivorous Butcher in the north-eastern US state of Minnesota is believed to be one of the first of its kind in the world, with its glass counters and slabs of locally-sourced “meat” and “cheese” which could fool even the most dedicated carnivore.

Playfully deceptive products on offer include chorizo, ribs, pepperoni, sausages, jerky, brat, ham, pastrami, roast beef, bacon, and pulled pork. Sandwiches, soups, as well as make-at-home kits are also on the menu.

The store’s website promises that their products offer an optimum about of protein and B-vitamins that other meat alternatives may lack.

Their selection has proven so popular that the shop were recently nominated for the 2016 USA Today Best Food and Drink Makers Award. Meanwhile, happy customers have been sharing images of the mind-boggling produce on social media.

Brother and sister duo Kale (yes, Kale) and Aubry Walch opened up their store in the north-eastern US state of Minneapolis last year.

The pair have grown their business from a small stand at a local farmers market to a bustling store thanks to a Kickstarter campaign which raised over £40,000.

Aubry, who has been vegan for almost two decades, began creating meat-free alternatives to the food that she grew up with in Guam a decade ago. Inspired by his sister, Kale later adopted the lifestyle, too.

“One person said, ‘I’m a food scientist, and I swear I can taste fat marbling in that sausage,’ ” Aubry recently told the New York Times. “Our goal is to fool people into saving the planet,” she added.

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