Security experts have, however, warned about the dangers of connecting to a public Wi-Fi network
Security experts have, however, warned about the dangers of connecting to a public Wi-Fi network

Facebook’s new feature helps you easily find free Wi-Fi

It will come in handy when you have terrible signal, or when you want to save mobile data

Aatif Sulleyman
Monday 03 July 2017 18:13
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Facebook is making it easier for you to find a Wi-Fi connection when you’re out and about.

The social network has announced an expansion to its Find Wi-Fi feature which, until now, has only been available in a select number of countries.

It’s now being rolled out worldwide, for both Android and iOS users.

Find Wi-Fi shows you nearby businesses that offer free Wi-Fi to customers, and lists them on a map.

It will come in handy when you have terrible signal, or when you want to save mobile data.

The feature will also provide more details about the businesses, such as what they do and their opening hours, as well as the name of the Wi-Fi network.

However, it only works for companies that actually state that they offer a free Wi-Fi connection on their Facebook page.

“We launched Find Wi-Fi in a handful of countries last year and found it’s not only helpful for people who are traveling or on-the-go, but especially useful in areas where cellular data is scarce,” wrote Facebook engineering director Alex Himel in a blog post.

“Find Wi-Fi helps you locate available Wi-Fi hot spots nearby that businesses have shared with Facebook from their Page. So wherever you are, you can easily map the closest connections when your data connection is weak.”

Once you’ve received the update, you’ll be able to find Find Wi-Fi in the ‘More’ tab in the app.

However, you should always be careful when connecting to a public network.

A recent report from iPass described coffee shops as “the most dangerous public Wi-Fi venue of all”.

It said: “Cafés and coffee shops are everywhere and offer both convenience and comfort for mobile workers, who flock to these venues for the free high speed internet as much as for the coffee.

“However, cafés invariably have lax security standards, meaning that anyone using these networks will be potentially vulnerable.”

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