A visitor passes by the Instagram application logo at the Young Entrepreneurs fair in Paris, France, February 7, 2018
A visitor passes by the Instagram application logo at the Young Entrepreneurs fair in Paris, France, February 7, 2018

Instagram Direct lets you send pictures that disappear after one view

The functionality places more control in users’ hands, and could also tempt people into sharing more intimate images

Aatif Sulleyman
Wednesday 21 February 2018 13:32
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Instagram Direct now lets you send pictures and videos that disappear after they have been viewed once.

After the person you’ve sent the image or clip to opens and views it, it will disappear from your conversation forever.

The move places more control in users’ hands, and could also tempt people into sharing more intimate or risqué images through Direct.

To send a picture or video that disappears after one view, all you need to do is open the Instagram Direct camera, take a picture or record a video and tap the “One View” button that will then appear at the bottom of the screen, below Send.

You can also choose to make your video or picture remain viewable for 24 hours, or keep it in the chat permanently.

Previously, you’d be able to view all pictures and videos sent through Instagram Direct more than once, but they would automatically disappear later on.

According to TechCrunch, Instagram first introduced the One View and 24 Hours options in November, with Keep In Chat coming out in January.

However, the rollout happened quietly, and Instagram hasn’t officially announced the new features yet.

A recently released report from eMarketer has predicted that more and more young people will quit Facebook and “prioritize social networks such as Instagram and Snapchat” over it.

“Facebook may have been central to defining the social media category, and it still has many uses. But younger consumers in particular are looking for something beyond utility,” the firm said.

“They want novelty and exclusivity too; the search for the latest buzz in social media will continue to lead them away from Facebook.”

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