iPhone 7: Apple warranty doesn’t cover water damage to ‘waterproof’ new phone

It all comes down what exactly IP67 means, and the danger of going in the shower

Andrew Griffin
Thursday 08 September 2016 15:02
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Apple has released the first ever waterproof iPhone. Except there’s a big caveat.

Though that phone has received a fairly high waterproof rating – IP67, which means that it’s splash resistant – Apple won’t actually be able to replace any phone that ends up breaking because it gets wet.

Apple’s own warranty makes clear that water damage is still possible and that, if it happens, it won’t be able to fix the phone for free.

“iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus are splash, water, and dust resistant and were tested under controlled laboratory conditions with a rating of IP67 under IEC standard 60529,” Apple’s official website reads. “Splash, water, and dust resistance are not permanent conditions and resistance might decrease as a result of normal wear.

“Do not attempt to charge a wet iPhone; refer to the user guide for cleaning and drying instructions. Liquid damage not covered under warranty.”

The kind of wear that the message seems to refer to is things like high-pressure water situations like shooting the phone with a shower or a pressure washer. The water resistance could also be overcome if the phone is left under water for a long period of time.

But Apple’s phones should be able to stand up to most water. In the event, the company showed somebody falling into a pool with their phone – and suggested that there’d be no problem with the phone resisting that sort of wetness.

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The rating of the new iPhone is actually equivalent with the first version of the Apple Watch. Though the company didn’t explicitly say that watch was waterproof, many people have reported that it has been able to last through multiple swims and heavy exposure to water.

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