Net neutrality: What you can do to help ‘save the internet’ and oppose the FCC ruling

A proposed Congressional Review Act could represent supporters' best hope

Aatif Sulleyman
Friday 15 December 2017 14:31
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Net Neutrality: Ajit Pai and FCC scraps online regulation changing how the internet works

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) this week controversially voted to end net neutrality in the US, but everyone opposed to the decision is still being urged to do all they can to resist it.

Multiple Senators and Attorneys General have already confirmed that they will legally challenge the move.

Ordinary people are also being encouraged to make their voices heard, by contacting their Senators, State Attorneys General and Members of Congress.

Senator Ed Markey has said he will call for a Congressional Review Act over the FCC vote result, which could allow Congress to reverse the net neutrality decision.

This could represent net neutrality supporters’ best hope, and people are being urged to get behind it.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has created an online form you can use to quickly ask your Member of Congress to use the Congressional Review Act to reverse the FCC’s "hasty and misguided dismantling of net neutrality protections”.

Save the Internet has created a similar tool that lets you increase pressure on lawmakers.

“To Members of Congress: The FCC vote to destroy the Net Neutrality protections cannot stand. I'm calling on you to work with your colleagues to use the Congressional Review Act to pass a ‘resolution of disapproval’ reversing the FCC's vote,” it says.

Save the Internet adds, “We need members of Congress to stand up for the open internet and for the digital civil rights of their constituents now. Please use the CRA to pass a resolution of disapproval.”

Twitter user @Celeste_Pewter has even prepared scripts for people to use over the phone while contacting lawmakers, in order to make the process much more straightforward.

“There is plenty that citizens can do,” the ACLU says.

“But the clock is now ticking because Americans may soon begin to see negative changes in the internet they’ve always known.”

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